Dr. Kenneth S. Paulsen

Historian and Genealogist

 

Nova Scotian Families

Boehner (Böhner)

Johann Georg Boehner came from "Ansbach" in 1752 with several other families and individuals from the same place.  It is not clear where "Ansbach" is located.  Was it one of the many villages in the Rhine River region with that name or a village in the Catholic Principality of Ansbach in modern-day Bavaria?  The Boehner family has spread throughout Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia, Massachusetts and Iowa.


Collicut (Collicutt; Clinton)

The Collicut family settled in Chester township, Nova Scotia.  The Collicut and Collicutt family remains a Chester family today.  The Collicuts are a Planter era family having settled in Chester about 1762.  The Collicut family came from Massachusetts Bay Colony to Halifax about 1752.  There was a Collicut family in Dorchester, Massachusetts in the 1600s from which the Chester family may be descended.


Deladeray

Louis Deladeray came to Nova Scotia in 1750 as a single man.  His origins are unknown, although it is suspected that he came from Alsace / Elsaß.  He married in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1752.  He and his wife Susannah Rösti went to Lunenburg, Nova Scotia in 1753.  All known descendants of Louis and Susannah Deladeray are through their daughter Johanna.  Among the descendants of the Deladeray family are the Hyson, Turner, and Saltzman families.


Emoneau (Emeneau, Emeno, Emino)

The Emoneau family came from the Payée de Montbéliard in 1752.  The family settled in Lunenburg in 1753 and received their 30-acre farm lot at First Peninsula.  The family homestead was the site of the brutal murder in 1791 when Frederic Emoneau, his wife and a grand-daughter were brutally murdered by brothers George Frederick and John Bouteillier.   Today the most common spellings of the family surname are Emeno and Emino.


Dr. Paulsen published a brief history of the family in the New England Historic Genealogical Society's publication NEXUS.  The article includes a discussion of the murder and the subsequent trial.  He intends to publish a more detailed discussion of the murder, the trial and the people involved.


Ewald (Awalt) 

The Ewald / Awalt family of Nova Scotia is descended from Johann George Ewald who emigrated to Nova Scotia as single man in 1751 on the Murdoch.  He came to Nova Scotia with Johann Wendel and Maria Apollonia (Ewald) Wuest.  Maria Apollonia Wuest was Johann Georg Ewald's elder sister.  The Wuest and Ewald families resided in Osthofen, Kur-Pfalz (Electorate and Kingdom of the Palatinate).   The progenitor of the Osthofen Ewald family was Christian Ewald of Groß-Rohrheim, Landgrafschaft Hessen-Darmstadt.  He and his wife Anna Cathatina Binder lived at Osthofen.  In 1745 Maria Apollonia Ewald married Johann Wendel Wuest at Osthofen;  he was from Eschellbrücken, Landgrafscaft Hessen-Darmstadt.  The family of Johann Georg Ewald settled at Rose Bay, Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia where he received his 30-acre farm lot in 1753-54. This genealogy of the Ewald and Wuest families is not complete.


Hiltz (Hüls)

The Hiltz family of Nova Scotia came from Ortenberg, Grafschaft Stolberg-Roßla.  The Hiltz family was in Ortenberg for two generations before Johann Heinrich and Johann Daniel Hiltz emigrated to Nova Scotia in 1751 on the Murdoch.  Earlier generations of the Hiltz / Hüls family were in the nearby village of Wenings, Grafschaft Isenberg.  Daniel Hiltz was a single man when he emigrated with his married elder brother Heinrich.  Daniel Hiltz settled at Lunenburg, Nova Scotia in 1753 and in 1758 married Rebecca Magdalena Lantz from Frankfurt am Main, Reichsstadt (Imperial Free City of) Frankfurt.  Heinrich and and Anna Gertraud (Kayser) Hiltz stayed in Halifax and eventually settled at Sackville, Nova Scotia.  Today descendants of Heinrich and Daniel Hiltz are found through out Canada and the United States.  This genealogy is not a complete accounting of their descendants.


Hyson (Heyson, Heison, Heÿson) 

The Hyson family are descended from Johann Friedrich Heyson and his wife Anna Catharina Junckerin who came to Nova Scotia in 1751 from Hering-Otzberg, Palatinate.  The family settled in the Mahone Bay area of Lunenburg township, Nova Scotia in 1753.  Many branches of the family are found in Mahone Bay, Oakland, Indian Point, Clearland, New Germany, and Simpson's Corner, Nova Scotia.  There are Hyson descendants all across Canada and the United States.


A selection of Hyson family photographs and information can be viewed at Hyson Family (a site also managed & maintained by Dr. Paulsen).


Dr. Paulsen is planning to publish the Hyson genealogy.  The material presented on-line represents the bare bones of his research.  The forthcoming Hyson family history will be fully documented regarding sources and will included significant historical data, documents, maps and photographs.


The New Ross area Hyson family is descended from Heinrich Heishon.  He was a disbanded German Napoleonic War soldier in the service of the British government and was part of the group of soldiers under the leadership of William Ross.  The origins of Heinrich Heishon in the German states is currently unknown.  He married a Lunenburg German woman named Elizabeth Catherine Hirtle.  The New Ross area Hyson family is not related to the larger Hyson family of the Mahone Bay and New Germany areas of Lunenburg County.


Lantz   

Johann Heinrich Lantz and his wife Anna Maria Milch with their three children emigrated to Nova Scotia in 1751 on the Murdoch.  Johannes Heinrich Lantz was born in Nieder-Erlenbach, Reichsstadt Frankfurt.  His wife Anna Maria Milch was born at Soden, Reichsstadt Frankfurt.  In 1753 they relocated to the Crown-sponsored settlement of Lunenburg when the majority of Foreign Protestant immigrants settled there.  Johann Heinrich Lantz received his 30-acre farm grant at Oakland, lot number 9.  Today the family is spread throughout North America.  This genealogy is not complete. 


Meisner (Meißner, Meissner, Meÿsner)

The Meisner family came from Glauberg, Graftschaft Stolberg-Gedern (now in modern German State of Hessen).  The family arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1751.  The Meisners settled in Lunenburg township, Nova Scotia in 1753.  The family received their grant at Centre Range, but eventually moved to Feltzen South and the Ovens.  After 1800, the family spread throughout Lunenburg County and the Eastern Shore of Nova Scotia.  Today Meisners are found all over Canada and the United States.  Research on this family continues.


Dr. Paulsen published a history of the German origins of the Meisner Family in volume 6 (2003) of the Journal of the Royal Nova Scotia Historical Society.  The title of the article is “The Meisner Family of Glauberg, Stolberg-Gedern amd Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, 1650-1810”.

 

Romkey (Ramge, Ramichen, Rompkey) 

The Ramichen and Uhrig families came to Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1750 from the village of Ober-Klingen in the Odenwald region of the current-day German state of Hessen.  Ober-Klingen and the neighbouring villages of Nieder-Klingen, Lengfeld, and Hering were part of the Electorate of the Palatinate.  Johann Wendel Ramichen / Ramge, his wife Anna Margaretha Uhrig, and their children spent three winters in Halifax before moving to Lunenburg in 1753.  Anna Margaretha Uhrig was the elder sister of Johann Leonard Uhrig who came to Lunenburg with his wife and daughter. 


Wendel Ramichen received his 30-acre farm lot at Mahone Bay in 1753.  The Ramichen family settled at Five Houses on the LaHave River after the death of Wendel Ramichen in 1757.  His only surviving son Conrad Ramge bought land at Five Houses in December 1781.  The name Ramichen evolved into Romkey and (less commonly) Rompkey.  Today, the Romkey and Rompkey family has spread throughout Canada and the United States.


The Ramge family continues in the Odenwald region of Germany and other regions of Germany.  Gabriele Neumann, née Uhrig has researched her branch of the Ramge family.  Her research may found on her website: http://www.neumannweb.de


Auf Deutsch:


Die Familien Ramichen und Uhrig kamen im Jahr 1750 aus der Ortschaft Ober-Klingen im Odenwald (Hessen in Deutschland) nach Halifax, Nova Scotia (Neu-Schottland in Kanada).  Ober-Klingen und die angrenzenden Ortschaften Nieder-Klingen, Lengfeld, und Hering gehörten zu dieser Zeit zum Kurfürstentum Pfalz.  Johann Wendel Ramichen (auch Ramge), seine Ehefrau Anna Margaretha Uhrig und ihre Kinder verbrachten drei Winter in Halifax, bevor sie dann im Jahr 1753 nach Lunenburg zogen.  Anna Margarete Uhrig war Johann Leonard Uhrigs ältere Schwester, der mit seiner Frau und seiner Tochter ebenfalls nach Lunenburg zog.

Im Jahre 1753 erhielt Wendel Ramichen eine 30 Acre (1 Acre ≈ 4047 m²) große Farm am Mahone Bay. Nach Wendel Ramichens Tod im Jahre 1757 übersiedelte die Familie zu „Five Houses“ am Fluß LaHave.  Sein einzig überlebender Sohn Conrad Ramge kaufte Land in „Five Houses“ im Jahr 1781.  Der Name Ramichen entwickelte sich zu Romkey und, jedoch weniger geläufig, zu Rompkey.  Noch heute verteilen sich die Familien Romkey und Rompkey über ganz Kanada und die Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika.

Auch im Odenwald und anderen Regionen Deutschland's leben noch heute Ramge-Familien. Gabriele Neumann, geborene Uhrig, hat ihren Zweig der Familie Ramge erforscht. Diese Forschung ist auf ihrer Internetseite zu finden: http://www.neumannweb.de.

 

Rosti (Rösti, Roesti, Rosty, Rösty) 

The Rösti family is originally from Frutigen, Canton Bern, Switzerland where David Rösti appears in the parish registers in 1579 when he married Barbli Schärer.  A descendant of David Rösti moved to neighbouring village of Adelboden.  The Nova Scotia branch of the family was from the village of Adelboden.  Gilgian Roesti and his family left Adelboden in 1750 and emigrated to Nova Scotia.  The family settled in Lunenburg township in 1753. The Roesti family descends through Gilgian Roesti’s granddaughter Maria Esther Roesti to the Hatt family and his granddaughter Johanna Deladeray to the Saltzman family and branches of the Hiltz, Hyson, Keddy, Roast, and Turner families among others.

 

Salzmann (Saltzman, Saltsman, Salsman)

The origins of Casper Friedrich Salzmann are vague.  He first appears in Lunenburg records as a member of Zion Lutheran Evangelical Church in 1771. His marriage record in the Lutheran Church states that he was from Mecklenberg (Germany); however, there is no known record of when he arrived in Nova Scotia.  Casper Friedrich Salzmann may have come as a child as part of another family group during the Foreign Protestant settlement of Lunenburg in 1753.  He first appears in the Zion Lutheran Church records at Lunenburg in the early 1770s.  The Saltzman family has two major branches in Nova Scotia: Country Harbour on the Eastern Shore, and New Ross / Annapolis Valley.  There are Hyson, Keddy and Turner descendants.

 

Uhrig (Urich, Urish) 

The Uhrig and Ramichen families came to Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1750 from the village of Ober-Klingen in the Odenwald region of the current-day German state of Hessen.  Ober-Klingen and the neighbouring villages of Nieder-Klingen, Lengfeld, and Hering were part of the Electorate of the Palatinate.  Johann Leonhard Uhrig, his wife Anna Margaretha Heuß, and their daughter spent three winters in Halifax before moving to Lunenburg in 1753.  Johann Leonhard Uhrig’s elder sister Anna Margaretha Uhrig was married to Johann Wendel Ramichen. 


Leonhard Uhrig received his 30-acre farm lot at what became known as Five Houses on the LaHave River.  The name Uhrig no longer exists in Nova Scotia.  Leonhard Uhrig and Anna Margaretha Heuß had only one known child, a daughter named Anna Barbara who was born in 1735 and who does not appear to have married.


The Uhrig family in Nova Scotia continues through Anna Margaretha Uhrig and her husband Wendel Ramichen.  They had seven children of which five came to Nova Scotia.  Like the Uhrig family, the Ramichen family also settles at Five Houses on the LaHave River.  The name Ramichen evolved into Romkey and (less commonly) Rompkey.


The Uhrig family continues in the Odenwald region of Germany and in the Mid-West of the United States.  There was a second migration of family members to Illinois in 1831.  Common variations of Uhrig include Uhrig, Urich and Urrich in Germany and Urish in the United States.  Andreas Uhrig of Reichelsheim/Odenwald has done extensive research on the German family, and Dr. Daniel W. Urish has provided research on the United States branch of the Uhrig family.  This research may be found on the bilingual website of Andreas Uhrig: http://www.uhrig-urish.com


Auf Deutsch:


Die Familien Uhrig und Ramichen kamen im Jahr 1750 aus der Ortschaft Ober-Klingen im Odenwald nach Halifax, Nova Scotia (Neu-Schottland in Kanada).  Ober-Klingen und die angrenzenden Ortschaften Nieder-Klingen, Lengfeld, und Hering gehörten zu dieser Zeit zur Kur Pfalz.   Johann Leonhard Uhrig, seine Ehefrau Anna Margaretha Heuß und ihre Tochter verbrachten drei Winter in Halifax, bevor sie dann im Jahr 1753 nach Lunenburg zogen.  Johann Leonhard Uhrigs ältere Schwester Anna Margarete Uhrig war mit Johann Wendel Ramichen verheiratet.

Leonhard Uhrig erhielt eine 30 Acre (1 Acre ≈ 4047 m²) große Farm, welche als „Five Houses“ (Fünf Häuser) am Fluß LaHave bekannt wurde.   Der Name Uhrig ist in Neu-Schottland ausgestorben.   Leonhard Uhrig und Anna Margarete Heuß hatten bekannter weise nur eine Tochter, Anna Barbara geboren 1735, von welcher nicht nachgewiesen ist, ob sie je geheiratete hat.

Die Uhrig Familie in Neu-Schottland lebte jedoch durch Anna Margaretha Uhrig und ihren Ehemann Wendel Ramichen fort.   Sie hatten sieben Kinder von denen fünf nach Neu-Schottland kamen.   So wie die Uhrig Familie wurde auch die Ramichen Familie in „Five Houses“ am Fluß LaHave seßhaft.   Der Name Ramichen entwickelte sich zu Romkey und, jedoch weniger geläufig, zu Rompkey.

Die Uhrig Familie besteht weiterhin in der Region Odenwald in Deutschland und auch im mittleren Westen der Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika.  1831 wanderten weitere Mitglieder der Familie Uhrig nach Illinois aus. Gebräuchliche Variationen des Namens Uhrig sind Urich und Urrich in Deutschland sowie Urish in die Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika.  Andreas Uhrig aus Reichelsheim/Odenwald hat ausgiebige Forschung über die deutsche Familie getätigt und Prof. Dr. Daniel W. Urish hat Forschung am amerikanischen Zweig des Uhrig Familie durchgeführt.   Diese Forschung ist zweisprachig gehalten und auf der Internet Website von Andreas Uhrig zu finden:

http://www.uhrig-urish.de



Völcker (Volcker, Voelcker)

The Family of Andreas Völcker and his wife Anna Catherina Nickel came to Nova Scotia in 1751 from Glauberg, Grafschaft Stolberg-Gedern (now in the modern German State of Hessen).  In 1753 the Völcker family settled in Lunenburg township, Nova Scotia.  Their land grant was at Centre Range.  Having only daughters, all descendants of the Völcker family are through the Wile, Hauptman (Huphman and Hupman) and Hatt/Hutt families and the surname in Nova Scotia became extinct.  The Wile and Hatt/Hutt families are found throughout Canada and the United States.  The Hauptman family name evolved into Huphman and Hupman and is generally found in Queens and Shelburne Counties of Nova Scotia.

 

Wambold (Wamboldt)

The Wambold family of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia has its origins in Zwingerberg, Landgrafschaft Hessen-Darmstadt.  The Wambold family was in Zwingerberg for the three geneations before brothers Johann Adam and Johann Peter Wambold / Wamboldt emigrated to Nova Scotia in 1750 on the Ann.  The Wambold family of Zwingenberg has its origins in Pfungstadt, Landgrafschaft Hessen (-Darmstadt).  The family can be traced back to Dieter Wambold who lived about 1510 to about 1565 at Pfungstadt.  This genealogy focuses on the German ancestry of Nova Scotia Wambold family.

 

Weinacht (Weynacht, Whynacht, Whynot) 

   (Less Common: Weinot, Whynock, Winot, Wynacht, Wynaught, Wynock, Wynot)

The Weinacht family came from the village of Mutterstadt in the Palatinate. Unfortunately church records begin in the 1690s, shortly after the Palatinate suffered an invasion from France.  The Weinacht family came to Nova Scotia in 1752.  They came to Lunenburg in 1753 and received their 30-acre farm lot in Mahone Bay.  The original spelling of the surname is no longer found.  The surname Weinacht, also spelled Weynacht has been transformed into Whynacht, Weinot, Whynot, Winot, Whynock, Wynock, Wynot and Wynaught.

 

White (Wight)

The origins of the White family of Lunenburg, Kings and Queens Counties, Nova Scotia are unknown.  One possible theory is that Andrew White of Lunenburg County is either the son or grandson of Planter Andrew White who settled in Annapolis County in the early 1760s.  Census records indicate that the Whites were of Irish origins, probably Scots-Irish.  Andrew White's death record indicates that he was born in Annapolis County.  The census records for his son James give conflicting information about his birth: Nova Scotia in the 1871 census and New Brunswick in the 1881 census.  By the 1830s the White family was settled at Pleasant River Road, Lunenburg County.  Eventually descendants moved to Aylesford and area, Kings County, Nova Scotia; Queens County, Nova Scotia; and Woburn, Massachusetts.  Other descendants stayed in Lunenburg County.


Dr. Paulsen published a history of the White Family in volume 12 (2009) of the Journal of the Royal Nova Scotia Historical Society.  The title of the article is “The White Family of Lunenburg, Kings and Queens Counties: A Scots-Irish? Family”.  Off-print copies are available from the author.

 

Young (Jung)

The Jung / Young families of Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia came from Lützellinden, Grafschaft Nassau-Weilburg.  The several Jung families arrived at Halifax in 1750 on board the Ann.  In 1753 they all went to Lunenburg when the Crown established the settlement there.  This genealogy concerns itself with the Nova Scotian descendants of Johannes Andreas and Anna Eulalia (Engel) Jung.  Three of their sons came to Nova Scotia.  Johannes and and Marianna (LeBlank) Jung settled at First Peninsula, Lunenburg County.  Most, of not all,  of the North American descendants of Johannes Andreas and Anna Eulalia Jung are through Johannes and Marianna Jung's children.  Heinrich Jung and his family appear to have all died in Nova Scotia before 1755.  The last son Adam Jung married in Nova Scotia.  His family appears to have died out as well.  This genealogy of the Jung / Young family is by no means complete.